Tag Archives: YA fiction

Signs in the Dark is called “a multi-faceted thriller”

Signs in the Dark by Susan Miura comes highly recommended by Donavan’s Literary Services.

Young adults who choose Signs in the Dark for either its intrigue or its insights into a deaf girl’s world are in for a wild ride in a multifaceted thriller that holds solid action and emotional revelations throughout. It’s highly recommended for teens seeking relationship-driven action stories that incorporate a sense of purpose and growth within its drama, especially those who like unexpected stories of love, commitment, and adversity. 

ONE CAPTIVE. Blindfolded, gagged, and bound, 17-year-old Haylie Summers has only one goal: stay alive. Nothing about her abduction makes sense. Deaf since birth, she can’t hear her captors and can only guess why they would take her. Is she about to be thrown into the dark abyss of human trafficking? Or was she kidnapped by the protestors who marched at the wildlife rescue center where she volunteers? Haylie fights the harsh reality that her capture resulted from Nathan’s unexpected text.

Need to talk. Can you meet me in 10 behind your garage? It was the last thing she saw before getting dragged into a van. But it can’t be Nathan, with his ebony eyes and easygoing smile that crumbles the walls around her heart. No, it can’t be Nathan. Can it?

ONE SUSPECT. After a childhood of disruptions, Peruvian-born Nathan Boliva likes to keep life simple. Haylie is not simple. She is beautiful. She is brilliant. And she is worth the risk of breaking out of his comfort zone. But days after asking Haylie on a date, Nathan finds himself targeted by the FBI for a crime he didn’t commit. Far worse, anything could be happening to Haylie as the search continues.

Anything.

A YA Novel You Won’t Want To Miss

Signs in the Dark by Susan Miura is one young adult novel you’ll want to read, and it’s available now!

ONE CAPTIVE.  Blindfolded, gagged, and bound, 17-year-old Haylie Summers has only one goal: stay alive. Nothing about her abduction makes sense. Deaf since birth, she can’t hear her captors and can only guess why they would take her. Is she about to be thrown into the dark abyss of human trafficking? Or was she kidnapped by the protestors who marched at the wildlife rescue center where she volunteers? Haylie fights the harsh reality that her capture resulted from Nathan’s unexpected text.

Need to talk. Can you meet me in 10 behind your garage? It was the last thing she saw before getting dragged into a van. But it can’t be Nathan, with his ebony eyes and easygoing smile that crumbles the walls around her heart. No, it can’t be Nathan. Can it?

ONE SUSPECT.  After a childhood of disruptions, Peruvian-born Nathan Boliva likes to keep life simple. Haylie is not simple. She is beautiful. She is brilliant. And she is worth the risk of breaking out of his comfort zone. But days after asking Haylie on a date, Nathan finds himself targeted by the FBI for a crime he didn’t commit. Far worse, anything could be happening to Haylie as the search continues.

Anything.

Guest Post by Felicia Bridges, Author of Kenya Quest

Mission SeriesI write the stories that come to me, the ones that grab me and won’t let go. I don’t do market research to determine what twist the plot should take or whether the family in my story should be more diverse or whether the next story will sell more copies if it is set in Venice vs. Venezuela. But there are times when, as authors, we need to look to the future and consider where our resources are best invested.

According to Jennifer Austin, https://jenniferaustinauthor.wordpress.com/2014/06/23/what-do-ya-readers-want/, based on a limited poll, YA readers are looking for less romance, especially love triangles, more sci fi, more diversity, and more fantasy but not sugar-coated fairytale fantasy. They want stories that reveal the darkness in the world, that aren’t afraid to confront evil or even allow evil to appear to triumph, but in the end they still want the “happily ever after.”

BookBrats also published a broader survey of what YA readers want a few years ago (http://www.bookbrats.com/ya-readership-survey-results/#.VlpUrd-rSu4).  The most important criterion according to those surveyed? Good writing. Well-developed characters. Rich, well-constructed plots. Realistic dialogue. In short, the most important ingredient for a successful novel was simply the quality of the writing.

The next critical foundation is originality. Once a story has taken the market by storm (think Twilight, The Hunger Games, Divergent), trying to emulate their proven success by copying the formula will fail miserably. Knock-offs will be compared relentlessly to the original, and seldom will they be found to exceed the one which set the standard. Readers have experienced that; now they want something new and different.

Be original. Be excellent. Write something wonderful.

More Awards!

We’re always thrilled for our authors when their books are recognized by contest judges, and we’re excited to congratulate Leanne Pankuch, Susan Miura, and Leslea Wahl for their recent wins!

1st Place in Storymonster’s Royal Dragonfly Book Awards Science Fiction/Fantasy category – and an honorable mention in the YA Fiction category—Dragon’s Truth!

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1st Place in Storymonster’s Royal Dragonfly Book Awards YA Fiction category—Shards of Light

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1st Place in Storymonster’s Royal Dragonfly Books Awards Ebook Young Adult Fiction Category—Where You Lead

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Have you read the 1st chapter of Miracle Girl?

Our next young adult book releases on November 30th, and the first chapter of this amazing novel, Miracle Girl, is available on Wattpad for free! So go ahead. Read. Get addicted. And preorder your copy of Miracle Girl today!

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Leanne Strong hates June eighth even though it’s supposed to a day for celebration.  Fifteen years ago on that date, baby Leanne was purported to be miraculously healed of a spinal cord defect after her mother prayed to a religious mystic who was later elevated to sainthood. Since Leanne’s unexplained cure, thousands of people gather in her small town every year to celebrate her miracle—a miracle she doesn’t remember but still accepts as real—most of the time.

When teen pitching phenom Braeden Dalisay moves into the house across the street from Leanne, he harbors a chip on his shoulder even larger than his athletic talent. Forced to spend the summer in the same law office, he and Leanne carry on a working relationship that vacillates between stormy and silent. After Leanne finds out that Braeden’s sister, Emeline, recently passed away, the reason for his behavior becomes clear. Emeline Dalisay was a girl who didn’t get a miracle.

Time softens Braeden’s anger, and he and Leanne eventually draw closer. But when he and his family are hit with another traumatic event, he pulls away, the unfairness of life a deep wound. Leanne wants to help Braeden and his family heal as much as she wants a relationship with him. More than that, she wants a miracle for Braeden.